Interview: Beverley Webb, Assistant Practitioner in Healthcare at Peverel court care

Beverley Webb - Level 5 Diploma for Assistant Practitioners in Healthcare graduate - Stone House Nursing Home, Aylesbury - Peverel Court Care

 

As we seek to implement the supporting of career pathways for our employees, we thought it a good time to catch up with Beverley Webb, a long-term member of our team and a recent graduate from the Level 5 Diploma for Assistant Practitioners in Healthcare.

 

Beverley has worked at Peverel Court care for 13 years and is our first graduate, having recently completed the Assistant Practitioner in Healthcare Level 5 Diploma. At Peverel Court Care, we’re committed to helping our employees to fulfil their potential by supporting them in career development through the introduction of career pathways. We spoke to Beverley to find out more about her career journey.

 

What were you doing before you joined Peverel Court Care?

I was born in Bebington, on the eastern side of the Wirral Peninsula – I’m a northern lass originally! It’s beautiful there. I had worked for two years at a residential care home near Bolton. Then I moved to the South East, and I was working for a printing company when I decided to return to a care role. I applied to Stone House and my first impression when I came into the grounds was ‘wow, what an amazing house!’. I was overwhelmed due to the size of the home and grounds – I love it. After one month I was offered a full-time position (I’d started as part-time). Within one year I was promoted to Senior Healthcare Assistant, then offered Head of Care after another 6 months. Now I’m the Senior Care Lead.

 

How does working for Peverel Court Care differ from your previous experience and expectations?

At the previous home I had to complete very long shifts. I had no specific dementia training, and it was difficult trying to help the residents with that lack of training. When I started in the care sector I didn’t have any real expectations. I didn’t expect to be where I am now. I just wanted to help people. Seeing how the elderly were treated was a big thing; I’m a caring person and don’t like to see people upset. So I want to make a positive difference to people’s lives.

When I was 16 I helped an elderly gentleman who was being harassed by a group of 15 and 16 years old who thought it was fun to intimidate an older person. That experience has had a big influence on my career to date. I now want more out of my career and it’s great I can do that at Peverel Court Care and in the care sector.

 

How did you find out about the opportunity to undertake the Assistant Practitioner qualification?

The Registered Manager had mentioned a new Assistant Practitioner qualification. I questioned whether I wanted to commit to studying at this stage of my career, but my RM really supported me. I have never achieved anything before, probably because I was the middle child! I didn’t have great grades at school, so when this opportunity arose I decided to go for it. My brother and sister also really supported me.

I was very excited when I was accepted onto the course, but I don’t think I was prepared for what was ahead. I thought because I have done my NVQ3, I have done my diploma in End of Life Care – I thought it would be a breeze. However, it was a challenging course.

 

How was the process of juggling study with work?

Difficult. It’s been very difficult working full-time whilst studying; I really had to manage my time efficiently . You have to put your family and social events on hold. Going for my treats out, going away for the weekend; they all had to be forgotten about for a little while. Weekends were also taken up by study as 7 hours per week were not enough for me to complete the required work. College was fortnightly from 9 to 4, plus the travel time on top, and then 3 hours study when I got back, and 6 hours on the weekends. I felt tired and became irritated, and I hoped this hadn’t affected the morale of the team around me.

There was so many times I wanted to give up! The sense of achievement and self-belief kept me going. Team members encouraging and supporting me really helped to get me through as well. I was crying with frustration at times due to the challenge of some of the modules. Do I regret doing it? No! It’s been such a great learning curve. I now mentor two colleagues who are also on the Assistant Practitioner course: I offer support and bring in my old text books for them. If it wasn’t for the excellent support network I may have quit or failed. You need people around you to guide you and listen, who don’t get frustrated.

 

How has the chance to take the Assistant Practitioner Diploma had an impact on your life?

In terms of work, it has provided me a different philosophy of healthcare; a better and different perspective of care. The Assistant Practitioner Diploma has given me the tools to examine the behaviours of people and their psychology, and to look deeper into why people say what they do. Everyone has a life story, so I look at things differently now. What are people really going through and do they need to have a chat? Also, with End of Life care, the training has made me consider whether we really take into consideration the carers; how do they feel? It’s made me think about how I work and how I see people.

One specific example of something new that I’ve learnt relates to communication with relatives and residents. In particular, about involving the resident more. Just because a resident has dementia, it doesn’t mean they cannot make decisions. It’s important to have their views, and also their relatives’ input and opinions. I think we sometimes forget that having a resident in a care setting has an effect on their relatives. I’ve had relatives crying because they feel guilty. It’s important we communicate well and inform them of the benefits of being in a professional care environment.

In the future I would like to explore some type of management role within the group,  working alongside the managers. I enjoy mentoring, helping new starters, and now with my skills, working closer with the Registered Nurses. 

In terms of my personal life, I’m a lot happier now that I have graduated, but I get bored with all the spare time instead! I feel a lot happier in myself though – me and my husband went out to celebrate! After all, for the last two years I have been studying.

 

How do you feel about having been given this opportunity?

It’s very good to have opportunities for professional and personal development; it boosts your self esteem and gives you such a great sense of achievement. To have this opportunity has been amazing, and I want to say a big thank you to Peverel Court Care for providing me with the chance to take the Assistant Practitioner course, I really appreciate it! It’s great for people that want to further their career prospects. If it wasn’t for PCC and their continued investment in their staff I would not be able to progress my career in the same way.

 

What do you think of Peverel Court Care as an employer and would you recommend them to your friends, family or other people considering a career in care?

This company is fantastic! It’s just lovely; the homely environment, the good atmosphere, and the relatives’ feedback is amazing. I have a real sense of pride in the relatives and residents excellent feedback.

I do recommend Peverel Court Care on social media, I always promote them! I would recommend that if anyone wants to give back something to society, working for PCC would be a great decision. You have to want to work in care and be passionate about it, but if you are, then it’s very rewarding. It’s about holding people’s hands and having empathy; you need all that and more. If you do, then it’s so rewarding, and you can go home with a sense of achievement. You’ve changed someone’s ordinary day into a great one. They may wake up unhappy but at the end of the day they are laughing and joking. Just to see a smile on their face and holding their hand is enough for me. I love it because I know I am making a difference. It might seem a little difference to some, but to them it’s a big difference.

About Peverel Court Care

Peverel Court Care is a group of one residential and two nursing homes, located in Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire: Bartlett’s Residential Care Home and Stone House Nursing Home in Aylesbury, and Merryfield House Nursing Home in Witney. We are a long-standing family business, providing personalised care, delivered by talented and compassionate people, in exclusive and idyllic settings.

With happiness at the heart of our homes, we recognise and respect the contribution made by our residents to society during their lifetimes. Valued by residents and their families; our reputation, investment in each property, and approach to appointing and developing our staff makes each home unique and the benchmark in premium care.

Share this

©2020 Peverel Court Care
Privacy Policy | Designed & Build by Streamstay
all rights reserved